Monday, September 7, 2015

Carrot Chiffon Cake


This cake is one happy discovery.  I was simply thinking of something to bake and I saw carrots in the fridge.  Voila! A new chiffon cake flavour!

I actually enjoy the normally dense carrot cake but making it in chiffon form, for me, just took the "like factor" up a notch. Instead of the carrots making the chiffon cake heavier than usual, I was actually surprised at how wonderfully soft, fluffy and moist the cake turned out to be! Initially, I thought it needed a little bit more of the spices but later found out that, as with traditional carrot cake, the flavour intensfied the day after it was baked.  

The best thing about this carrot cake is there's actually no need to decorate or fill it to be able to fully enjoy it.  A simple cream cheese frosting and some chopped walnuts on top are all it takes. Enjoy it with a cup of coffee or tea!

CARROT CHIFFON CAKE (makes one 8x3 round cake)

{A}
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sifted cake flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
pinch of ground cloves
6 tablespoons white sugar

{B}
4 egg yolks, from large eggs, at room temperature* 
¼ cup corn/canola oil
1/3 cup milk

{C}
4 eggwhites*
¼ teaspoon cream of tartar

{D}
6 tablespoons white sugar

{E}
100g finely grated carrots

*Weight of one egg is approximately 55-60g.  Labelled as LARGE in some places but XL eggs in Australia.

Procedure:
1. Preheat oven to 170 degrees Celsius.
2. In a large bowl, combine {A} well. Add in {B}. Beat with electric mixer or by hand until smooth and well blended.
3. In a separate bowl, beat {C} on high speed until frothy. Gradually add in the sugar {D} and beat until stiff peaks are formed. In three additions, gradually and gently fold in egg whites into egg yolk mixture. Fold in the grated carrots along with the last addition of eggwhites.**  Pour batter into an ungreased 8” round, 3” high pan. (I used a 9x7x3 rectangular pan.)




4. Bake for about 50 minutes or until top springs back when lightly touched. Invert pan into wire rack immediately and cool completely.
5. To release cake from pan, carefully run a thin knife around sides of pan and invert cake onto a large serving plate.

** Alternatively, you can also mix in the grated carrots with {B}.



20 comments:

  1. Corinne, do you always fold whipped eggwhites in to heavier mixtures with a whisk? The resulting mixture doesn't deflate on you?

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    Replies
    1. Actually, the use of a balloon whisk achieves the least amount of air loss (as long as you fold, not whisk!). I always finish off with a spatula to ensure that I get everything from the bottom folded in.

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    2. I never knew that! They always say that we should use a whisk only in the first folding. But I'll give your method a try. Maraming chalamat!

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  2. Have you heard of the hummingbird cake? It's got a base of banana cake but it's got some chopped carrots and pineapple in it. I'm thinking of turning this recipe of yours into something of that sort for Christmas by replacing half of the carrots with pineapple and then perhaps introducing the banana element as a filling with some pastry cream in the middle. Will report the results!

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    Replies
    1. Good luck with that!

      My next chiffon experiment is actually banana. We'll see how I go.

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    2. Really?! If things go well in that experiment, and you're willing to share the recipe, I'll be more than obliged. :D

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  3. Could you please post a recipe of soft and yummt Spanish bread? Please? I really like your Ensaymada recipe. ��

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  4. Corinne, this was a hit with my family last weekend! My brother, however, did make a small criticism about something tasting too strong. I figured it could be the ginger, so next time, I will perhaps halve the ginger. BTW, I also threw in some manjar blanco (peruvian version of the dulce de leche) as filling and topping. It complimented the spices and the cream cheese frosting really well.

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    Replies
    1. Did you use ground cloves? Cause that might be what your brother tasted. That has a very strong flavour that is why I only use a pinch.

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    2. Yes, I did! I only used about an eighth of a teaspoon, so I don't think it's the cloves. Besides, there were some instances in which tinolang manok came into mind (lol) while eating the cake, so I think it is the ginger. Perhaps I over-measured it.

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    3. 1/8 tsp is actually still a little much. A pinch measurement is half of that (1/16). I still think it's that! :)

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  5. Corinne, I made the recipe again last Sunday. I halved the ginger and kept the measurement I had used for the cloves. It was the really ginger that did it previously. :D

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  6. hi corrine, i was just wondering if i can use the meringue buttercream with cream cheese for a carrot cake?
    ty

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  7. corinne ask ko lang since you always baked chiffon paano mo ma prevent na hnd mag stick sa bottom ng baking pan yung chiffon mo? thanks

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    Replies
    1. Chiffon cakes do need to stick to the pan to prevent sinking. I don't even line my pans with baking paper anymore so my cakes really stick BUT they come out with no problem by jiust tapping the bottom and shaking the pan gently.

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  8. Hi there,
    Do you turn your pan upside down after baking?
    Best,
    Ching

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is stated in the recipe to invert pan immediately after baking.

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